direkt zum Inhalt springen

direkt zum Hauptnavigationsmenü

Sie sind hier

TU Berlin

Page Content

Three conferences in three weeks

During the last three weeks Prof. Timo Hartmann was at three international conferences all over the world.

The first one was the IWCCE (International Workshop on Computing in Civil Engineering) from June 25-27, 2017 in Seattle, Washington (United States). The workshop dealt with the challenges of computing in the Civil Systems field with several different approaches and was divided into different sessions regarding topics like Infrastructure Monitoring, Control and Analysis, Construction Management, Energy, Sustainability and Resilience, BIM & CIM, Modeling & Simulation, Smart Safety and Health, Asset and Facility Management, Robotics and Automation and even Augmented & Virtual Reality. Prof. Hartmann conducted one of the session dealing with BIM & CIM (Session 6A).

The second was the LC³ Conference in Heraklion, Crete (Greece) from July 4-12, 2017 (he did not attend the whole conference). The event hosted "three major conferences (CIB W78, CONVR and IGLC), and supplementing them with an industry day, a BIM workshop, the LC3 summer school for graduate students on BIM and Lean, the LC3 doctoral competition, the LC3 Mentoring programme, and several social and networking events" (© LC³).

The third and still ongoing conference is the 24th EG-ICE (European Group of Intelligent Computing in Engineering) from July 10-12, 2017 in Nottingham (UK). Lucian Ungureanu submitted a paper regarding "Natural language controlled parametric design" and presented it there yesterday in a 20 minute talk. Prof. Hartmann conducted a session dealing with Building Information Modeling (BIM) and gave a talk with colleagues from the University of Bremen about a joint paper ("Towards Precedent Based Design Foundations for Parametric Design Systems").

Prof. Ian Smith (EPFL) and Prof. Timo Hartmann (TU Berlin)
Lupe

Zusatzinformationen / Extras

Quick Access:

Schnellnavigation zur Seite über Nummerneingabe

Auxiliary Functions